Monday, May 1, 2017

Painters Painting (1973)


Your movie for today, Painters Painting.  It's a documentary made in the 1970s.  The quality in some parts is not so great, but it was the 70s, they didn't have an app for that yet.
You really need to keep an open mind while watching this one. These are real interviews with real artists about their work and at first it feels like it's all about Jackson Pollock, but it's not. I had to pause and walk away several times from this. The BS was just getting too deep.  About half way through I thought to myself, these are artists alright, con artists, but sadly they were conning themselves. When some of them spoke about their work I sensed a feeling of sadness, like they could tell they were having a bad case of word vomit but if they didn't say these things nobody would take them seriously. It's like they had to live up to the hype. They wanted to continue being Johnny Bravo and hopefully nobody would notice that the suit was starting to go threadbare.
There was an actual laugh out loud moment when de Kooning was being interviewed and was asked something like, what does it mean to be painterly. His response, after a very long pause and dumb look on his face, "You can see it was done with a brush".
Moving on to the artist that carried on about how important titles of paintings are. A title must lead you into the painting, blah blah. Then he goes on to describe how he came up with a title for a piece he couldn't come up with a title for. Open a book, it has to be a favourite, and there you go. He opened a book, didn't look and placed his finger on a page and wherever it landed that was the title. That's how you art!
Then there's this one, "it's a zip, not a stripe".  Sir, you painted stripes, those are stripes. It's even more funny when he goes on to explain that he painted all of these "zips" then had to go back and figure out why he did it.
There are some quality moments in this one, lots of food for thought is served up so give it a shot. 

1 comment:

  1. It sounds all the more "emperor's new clothes" coming on the heels of Vettriano's plain speak. Painting is getting better. It's a shame the art world is missing it.

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